Darood Abdirahman bin Isma'il al-Jabarti

April 13, 2006

The Darod (Somali: Daarood, Arabic: بني داوود‎) is a Somali clan. The father of this clan is named Abdirahman bin Isma'il al-Jabarti, but is more commonly known as Darod. In the Somali language, the word Daarood means "an enclosed compound," a conflation of the two words daar (compound) and ood (place enclosed by wall, trees, woods, fence, etc).
The Darod population in Somalia lives principally in the north, with a presence in the Mogadishu area as well as southwestern Somalia. Outside of Somalia proper, there are various Darod sub-clans in the Ogaden and the North Eastern Province (currently administered by Ethiopia and Kenya, respectively), as well as Yemen. Several sources, including the Canadian Report of the Somalia Commission of Inquiry, indicate that the Darod is the largest Somali clan.
Somali clan
Darod
بني داوود
Regions with significant populations
Somalia
Ethiopia
Yemen
Kenya
Languages
Somali and Arabic
Religion
Sunni Islam
Related ethnic groups
Banu Hashim, Meheri, Hawiye, Isaaq, other Somali clans
The Darod (Somali: Daarood, Arabic: بني داوود‎) is a Somali clan. The father of this clan is named Abdirahman bin Isma'il al-Jabarti, but is more commonly known as Darod. In the Somali language, the word Daarood means "an enclosed compound," a conflation of the two words daar (compound) and ood (place enclosed by wall, trees, woods, fence, etc).
The Darod population in Somalia lives principally in the north, with a presence in the Mogadishu area as well as southwestern Somalia. Outside of Somalia proper, there are various Darod sub-clans in the Ogaden and the North Eastern Province (currently administered by Ethiopia and Kenya, respectively), as well as Yemen. Several sources, including the Canadian Report of the Somalia Commission of Inquiry, indicate that the Darod is the largest Somali clan.
However, other sources such as the CIA and Human Rights Watch indicate that the Hawiye is the largest Somali clan
Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Nobility
3 Lineage
4 Sons of Daarood Ismail
5 Clan tree
6 Notable Darod people
7 Darod's tomb
8 Notes
9 References
10 External links
[edit]History

The majority of Darod clan members claim to be descendants of Muhammad ibn Aqil, son of Aqeel ibn Abi Talib. Aqeel ibn Abi Talib was the second of four sons of Abu Talib ibn ‘Abd al-Muttalib, who was the uncle and protector of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad. Abu Talib during those early days was head of the Banu Hashim. The Darod have strong tribal relationships with the other Hashemites.
According to early Islamic books and Somali tradition, Muhammad ibn Aqil's descendant Abdirahman bin Isma'il al-Jabarti (Darod), a son of the Sufi sheikh of the Qadiriyyah order, fled his homeland in the Arabian Peninsula after an argument with his uncle.[5] During the 10th or 11th century CE,[6] he is believed to have then settled in northern Somalia just across the Red Sea and married the daughter of the Dir chief, which is said to have given rise to the Darod clan family.[5] A similar clan mythology exists for the Isaaq, whom are said to have descended from one Shaykh Ishaq ibn Ahmad al-'Alawi, another Banu Hashim who came to Somalia around the same time.[5][6] As with Sheikh Isaaq, there are also numerous existing hagiologies in Arabic which describe Sheikh Darod's travels, works and overall life in northern Somalia, as well as his movements in Arabia before his arrival.[7]
The Darod were supporters of Imam Ahmad ibn Ibrihim al-Ghazi during his 16th century conquest of Ethiopia, especially the Geri, Marehan, Yabarre, Harti and Bartire sub-clans, who fought at the Battle of Shimbra Kure and many others.[8]
[edit]Nobility

The Darod clan has produced numerous noble Somali men and women over the centuries, including many Sultans. Traditionally, the Darod population was mostly concentrated in the northern and northeastern cities on the Gulf of Aden and upper Indian Ocean coast in the Horn of Africa. Darod noble men ruled these settlement pockets until the European colonial powers changed the political dynamics of Somalia during the late 19th century. Before many Darods began pushing southward in the mid-1850s, the Warsangali Sultanate governed the interior regions of Sanaag and Sool, while Majeerteen sultanates held steadfast in solidly established posts from Bosaso to Hobyo.
In addition to their traditional strongholds in northern Somalia, Marehan, Ogaden, and Harti Darod members settled further down south and southwest in the Gedo region (a region which was part of Upper Jubba as well as the entire length of the Jubaland region, composed of Gedo, Middle Jubba and Lower Jubba).
[edit]Lineage

Darod is the son of the famous Sufi Sheikh, Ismail bin Ibrahim Al-Jabarti, who is believed to have been born in Arabia. Tradition holds that he is descended from the Banu Hashim.[5]
According to the book Aqeeliyoon, his lineage is: Abdirahmaan Bin Ismaa'iil Bin Ibraahim Bin Abdirahmaan Bin Muhammed Bin Abdi Samad Bin Hanbal Bin Mahdi Bin Ahmed Bin Abdallah Bin Muhammed Bin Aqil Bin Abu-Talib Bin Abdul-Mutalib Bin Hashim.[6]
[edit]Sons of Daarood Ismail

Darod had five sons:
Ahmed bin Abdirahman: Axmed-Sade Daarood
Muhammad bin Abdirahman: Maxamed-Kablalax Daarood
Hussien bin Abdirahman: Xuseen-Tanade Daarood
Yousuf bin Abdirahman: Yusuuf-Awrtable Daarood
Eissa bin Abdirahman: Ciise Daarood
[edit]Clan tree

There is no clear agreement on the clan and sub-clan structures and many lineages are omitted. The following listing is based upon the World Bank's Conflict in Somalia: Drivers and Dynamics from 2005 and the United Kingdom's Home Office publication, Somalia Assessment 2001.[9][10]
Darod (Daarood)
Geri Kombe[11][12][13][14]
Marehan
Red Dini
Rer Hassan
Eli Dheere
Kabalah
Absame
Ogaden
Makabul
Mohamed Zubeir
Aulihan
Jidwaq
Harti
Dhulbahante (Dolbahante)
Warsangali (Warsengeli)
Majeerteen (Mijerteen)
Omar Mahmud
Issa Mahmud
Osman Mahmoud (Osman Mahmud)
David D. Laitin and Said S. Samatar offer a slightly different table:[15]
Darod (Daarood)
Sade (Marehan)
Rer Diine
Rer Siyaad Hussen
'Ele
Wagarda
Talhe
Yuusuf (Awrtable)
Tanade (Leelkase)
Kabalah
Koombe
Harti
Dhulbahante
Warsangali
Majeerteen
Bartire
Jidwaq
Geri
Absguul
Ogaden
In the south central part of Somalia the World Bank shows the following clan tree:[16]
Darood
Kablalah
Koobe
Kumade
Isse
Sade
Mareehan
Facaye
Ortoble
Leelkase (Lelkase)
In Puntland the World Bank shows the following:[17]
Darod
Harti
Ogaden
Marehan
Awrtable
Lelkase
[edit]Notable Darod people

Abdulqawi Yusuf, Majeerteen, international lawyer and judge at the International Court of Justice
Zakariye Haji Abdi, Leelkase, former Somali Minister for Post and Telecommunication and leader of the Alliance for the Re-liberation of Somalia
Mohammed Sheikh Adden, Marehan, Somali intellectual, former head of Somali Technological Development, Minister of Information, Minister of Education, Marehan, Head of the Ideology Bureau SRRC
Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed, Majeerteen, President of Somalia (2004–2008)
Abdulrahman Jama Barre, Marehan, Somali Foreign Minister and close relative of Siad Barre
Siad Barre, Marehan, third President of Somalia, 1969–1991
Fatimo Isaak Bihi, Marehan, first Somali female ambassador, Ambassador to Geneva, Director of the African Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Abdi Bile, Dhulbahante, winner of the 1,500 metres at the "1987 World Championships in Athletics"
Faarax Maxamed Jaamac Cawl, Warsangeli, writer
Hassan Abshir Farah, Majeerteen, former Mogadishu mayor, Somali ambassador to Japan and later to Germany, interior minister of Puntland, prime minister of Transitional Federal Government from Arta, and current TFG minister of fishing and marine resource
Nuruddin Farah, Ogaden, prominent writer and winner of the 1998 Neustadt International Prize for Literature
Abdirahman Mohamud Farole, Majeerteen, President of Puntland
Ali Khalif Galaydh, Dhulbahante, former TNG Prime Minister of Somalia
Mohamed Yussuf Haji, Ogaden, Defense Minister of Kenya
Ali Matan Hashi, Marehan, first Somali pilot, commander of Somali Airforce 1959-1978, Minister of Justice, Minister of Health, Somali Nationalist.
Mohammed Abdullah Hassan, Ogaden, the Sayyid; religious and nationalist leader of the Dervish State; called the Mad Mullah by the British
Mohamud Muse Hersi, Majeerteen, former President of Puntland
Mohamed Abdi Hashi, Dulbahante, former President of Puntland, Former Vice-president of Puntland, Former Chairman of USP (United Somali Party) Pan-Somali party. Known for his surpassing integrity, nationalism and fairness.
Aden Ibrahim Aw Hirsi, Marehan, Author, Islamic Jurisprudence/Political Science scholar, governor of Gedo region 2007-
Mohamud Hashi Abdi Hoosh, Marehan, Jubba Regional Army Command 1980-1991
Abdirizak Haji Hussein, Majeerteen, Prime Minister of Somalia.
Ahmed Farah Ali 'Idaja', Marehan, one of the first Somali language writers and 'father' of the Somali written folklore
Warsame Indhoole, Marehan, Director of the Somali Developmental Crash Program, oversaw the successful Somali literacy campaign
Hirsi Magan Isse, Majeerteen, scholar and one of the leaders of the Somalian revolution
Osman Yuusuf Keenadiid, Majeerteen, inventor of the Osmanya writing script
Yaasiin Cismaan Keenadiid, Majeerteen, author of the Somali Dictionary and founding member of the Somali Youth League
Mohammed Awale Liban, Majeerteen, designed the flag of Somalia[18]
Farah Maalim, Ogaden, Deputy Speaker in the Parliament of Kenya
Mire Hagi Farah Mohamed, Majeerteen, Somali Finance Minister 2004-2006, and former Mayor Of Kismayo port City
Mohammed Said Hersi Morgan, Majeerteen, defence minister beginning of 1990s
Mohammed Jibril Muse, Majeerteen, former Chief of Somali Secret Service, General and later on Police chief of state of Puntland[19]
Said Sheikh Samatar, Leelkase, professor at Rutgers University
Abdirashid Ali Shermarke, Majeerteen, second President of Somalia, 1967–1969
Omar Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke, Majeerteen, Prime Minister of Somalia, and son of Abdirashid Ali Shermarke
Asli Hassan Abade, Ogaden, First Somali female pilot and prominent member of the Somali Air Force
Mohamoud Ali Shire, Warsangeli, Sultan of former "British Somaliland" (1897–1960)
Hussein Shuqul, Marehan, Head of "Jaalle Siyaad" National Military College
Ahmed Warsame, Marehan, Head of the Somali Military
Xasan Xayle, Warsangeli, Somali poet from Las Khorey